Practical Archaeology

Often the best way to research an object is to make a replica. The techniques of the blacksmith have not changed so much over the centuries, and the smith may be able to put himself in the shoes of his predecessor, taking account of the constraints of materials and equipment. In a number of instances we have worked successfully with archaeologists to unravel questions about the ‘why’, in terms of the ‘how’.

Heritage Brochure

This link will take you to our e-brochure page which contains our brochure on wrought iron as well as other …

Mary Rose Cannon

We were asked to reproduce a nearly exact replica of a seven inch bore wrought iron stave gun recovered from …

Viking Padlock

A few years ago the Jorvik Centre in York approached us to make replica Viking padlocks. These were for their …

Time Team – Replica Cannon Muzzle

We were asked to make a replica cannon muzzle to help show that local blacksmiths in the late 1400's could …

Temple Mill in Leeds

We have just finished the testing of various wrought iron tie-bars at a listed building in Leeds. We did visual …

Henry V Tomb – New charcoal iron hinge

My office staff doesn't waste their spare time. They like to fiddle about on the computers, and send e-mails about …

Slave Collars made for Hull Museum

New ironwork for a Roman well

Archaeologists from the Museum of London, working in two Roman wells in Gresham Street in London, uncovered the well preserved …

Titanic Rivets

We were commissioned to make rivets to the same specifications as the originals used on the Titanic as part of …